Eid!

“Kul yom wa antee bikhayer” (a greeting about how you are well every year) was the first thing I heard from my host mother Friday morning as I walked into the living room. Music was playing in the living room and a lovely spread was set on the table.

I have celebrated Eid al-Adha in Oman, but was very excited to celebrate the other Eid, Eid al-Fitr (the 3-day celebration at the end of Ramadan) in Jordan.

In the morning, we sat around the living room, eating homemade delicious ma’amoul cookies (they are so amazing– soft cookies filled with dates) and drinking coffee. Then, everyone started getting ready (people buy new clothes for Eid) and my host family gave me a necklace as a present, a necklace that both my host sisters have; it was such a sweet and thoughtful gift!

IMG_4270At about 6, after lunch (lunch is heavy and eaten late in Jordan), we headed to Irbid, which is the city in which my host mother’s family lives (my host father’s family is all in Palestine).

The drive was only about an hour away, and on the way, we stopped at a cemetery, to briefly pay respects to my host father’s parents, who are buried there. My host mother explained that during Eid, one should do this, but the visit should be short and should not be filled with sadness, but with happiness for it is Eid.

We got to Irbid and went to my host mother’s parent’s house. Irbid reminded me a lot of Bahla in Oman, for there are more simple houses, scattered (as it is not a city as Amman is). We spent the evening sitting in the living room, socializing (reminded me again of Bahla and how the days were spent sitting in the living room, with the family talking and catching up). Women also kept their hair covered, unless the males in the room were brothers. The only biggest difference I found from Oman was that both males and females sat in the same room, though this may simply be because everyone there was family (though it seemed more appropriate for gender mixing). I also found the decorations in houses in Bahla to be more present (a bit generalizing, but this is simply from my experience), but this may reflect the wealth that is more present in the Gulf. Otherwise, I almost felt as though I was back in Bahla, for there were so many similarities.

We sat around in the living room and ate falafel sandwiches and drank tea. My host grandfather and some of the other men in the family smoked hookah (they had at least 2 hookahs in the house as it is a big part of Jordanian culture). Later, we finally went to bed. I shared a room with my host sisters and we slept on little pads on the floor. I also found it interesting as the toilet in the house was a Turkish toilet!

The next day was similar to Friday evening; we sat in the living room and hung out the whole day. We had lunch at 4:30 and it was delicious! It was interesting because my host mother’s brother cooked the whole meal (he apparently loves cooking) and unlike Oman, where the men would frequently be served first in another room, we all went to get food at the same time and sat all together. We also ate with individual plates and silverware, which was another difference from Oman, where we would sit on the ground and eat from a shared plate. The meal was delicious– probably one of the best meals I have eaten so far in Jordan (there is a photo of it below as well as a photo of one of the sitting rooms in the house).

After a pleasant evening drinking tea, we drove home and I immediately passed out in bed. I am so grateful for my host family to bring me to introduce me to their family. Everyone was so welcoming and kind and made me feel right at home. I also loved being able to experience Jordanian life outside Amman, and really was able to experience part of Jordanian’s culture that one would not experience without a host family. Truly a wonderful experience.

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