Ramadan Experience

This past Monday and Tuesday, I decided to fast and celebrate Ramadan with my host family. I chose these specific days because Monday was Leylat al-Qadr, the most holy night of Ramadan in which it is believed that this was the night in which the first verses of the Qur’an were revealed to the prophet Muhammed. I wanted to do two days because I feel as though simply fasting one day does not allow one to fully experience fasting as a part of it is during Sahoor (the meal eaten before dawn), in which one wakes up to eat and drink a lot of water to prepare for the next day.

I began Monday morning at 3 am for Sahoor. We ate a typical Jordanian dish, which is watermelon with salted cheese and bread. After filling up and drinking lots of water, I went to sleep and then woke up for school.

When fasting, one cannot eat or drink anything until sunset, so when we had Iftar, I was so much more excited about it than I had been any other day. Drinking my first cup of water felt amazing and I could literally feel the water going down in my body (there’s a saying in Arabic about this).

That night was special for Leylat al-Qadr. After we ate, my host family invited me to the mosque with them, so we went from 9-10 for the prayer that happens every night. In the mosque, the women go through a separate entrance and pray on a level above where the men are praying. One can not see the other gender, but one can hear the Imam leading everyone in prayer. I followed my host family’s motions for the next hour and from what I understand (I was just following so I am not sure of the significance and meaning of the movements), it was a cycle of certain actions of different types of bowing.

We came back to the house and I slept for 2 hours and then at 1, we went back to the mosque for the special Leylat al-Qadr prayer. This prayer was from 1-4 am, and was similar to what we had previously done but a little bit different (again, not totally sure of the meaning of the different positions). By the time we were done, I was exhausted (some of the positions really hurt one’s legs!!!). It was a great experience to see everyone doing something in conjunction, as all the women were in lines and doing the same movements. In between different sections, there were quick breaks for people to get water.

At 4, the prayer ended, and we all sat on the ground with plastic sheets on the ground. We all ate sahoor together (small pastries provided by the mosque) and by 5, I was heading back home, exhausted.

School the next day was hard as I could not drink water or eat and I was so tired. After school, though, I came home and napped until Iftar.

Fasting was a really interesting experience and I am glad I got a glimpse of what it is like. I now have a lot more respect for all millions of Muslims around the world who fast every day during Ramadan. It is a hard thing to do, especially in such a hot climate! I found that the hardest part was not actually the lack of food, but that one cannot drink water. It is also hard to see other people eating food/drinking and to keep one’s mind from thinking about Iftar. The hardest part that comes from not eating and drinking is the tiredness, as I felt a bit foggy the whole day. I have a lot more respect for my teachers who have to teach while fasting every day! Though I am not sure that I’ll be fasting again, it was a great experience and though I can not at all claim to understand what it is like to fast a month, I am so grateful to my host family for sharing so much of their culture and religion with me.

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